June 2014

Stand in solidarity with the homecare workers in Illinois who stand with us! #HarrisvQuinn

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: JUNE 30, 2014

Home Care Workers Vow to Stand Up for Good Jobs and Quality Home Care in Wake of Harris v. Quinn Ruling

 

Caregivers to Work with States and Consumers to Ensure a Strong Voice for Care


WASHINGTON, DC –
Home care workers and consumers are ready to stand up for quality home care in the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court ruling in Harris v. Quinn today.

“No court case is going to stand in the way of home care workers coming together to have a strong voice for good jobs and quality home care,” said SEIU President Mary Kay Henry. “At a time when wages remain stagnant and income inequality is out of control, joining together in a union is the only proven way home care workers have of improving their lives and the lives of the people they care for.”

The ruling places at risk a system of consumer-directed home care in Illinois that has proven successful in raising wages, providing affordable health care benefits, and increasing training. The number of elderly Americans will increase dramatically in the coming years. States need to build a stable, qualified workforce to meet the growing need for home care—and having a strong union for home care workers is the only approach that has proven effective.

“I count on my home care provider for so much—I wouldn’t be able to work or get through the day without her,” said Rahnee Patrick, a home care consumer and advocate from ACCESS Living in Chicago.” “I’m worried that I could lose her if her wages and benefits don’t keep up with the cost of living.”

The case was brought by the National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation, an extreme anti-worker group whose funders include billionaires like Charles Koch and the Walton family. It is the latest in a decades-long attack on the rights of working people to join together to improve their jobs and the quality of services they provide.

“They are trying to divide us and limit our power, but we won’t stop standing together for our families and our consumers” said Flora Johnson, a home care provider from Chicago. “Before we formed our union, I made less than $6 an hour, but by uniting we are set to make $13 an hour by the end of the year. I know from experience that we are stronger together.”

“For our parents and grandparents to get the care they need to live at home, workers need a strong voice in a union,” Henry said. “I know that Flora Johnson other SEIU members are determined to keep up the fight to end poverty wages and ensure quality care.”

###

Today, the Supreme Court issued its decision in Harris v. Quinn. In a 5-4 decision drafted by conservative Justice Samuel Alito, the conservative majority of the Court dealt a blow to the partnership forged between the State of Illinois and homecare workers through their union, SEIU Health Care Illinois-Indiana (SEIU HCII). In a closely divided ruling, the conservative wing of the Court overruled the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals and held that the First Amendment bars Illinois homecare workers from adopting a fair share requirement to ensure that everyone shares in the costs of the bargaining.

The majority opinion does not throw out the homecare model of exclusive representation and collective bargaining rights for homecare workers or those same rights for workers who are not fully fledged public employees. It left intact SEIU HCII’s status as the exclusive representative of home care workers, and the contract between SEIU HCII and the State of Illinois. The decision does, however, eliminate SEIU HCII’s ability to charge a fair share fee to bargaining unit members who are not members of the union. And the court indicates that agency fee arrangements should be confined to contracts covering “full-fledged” public employees.

The Court did not go so far as to overrule the 1977 Supreme Court decision in Abood v. Detroit Board of Education. This means that traditional public employees can continue to join together in a union and retain the right to negotiate a fair share contract provision.

The Court found that Illinois homecare workers could be denied this protection because they are “quite different from full-fledged public employees.” Among the key facts upon which the relied in distinguishing Abood are that State law requires that all personal assistants be paid the same rate, and that the union cannot file grievances if a consumer fires his or her home care worker.

This decision will be a serious setback for Illinois, the clients served in this system and the dedicated homecare workforce. The decision’s impact on fair-share fee arrangements in other states where homecare workers have joined together in unions will be analyzed on a case-by-case basis.

###

“No court case is going to stop us!”

That is the resounding message being spoken since the Supreme Court issued a ruling on Harris v Quinn which places at risk Illinois home care workers ability to come together to have a strong voice for good jobs and quality home care.

Show your solidarity and share our graphic now.

The case was brought by the National Right to Work Foundation, an extreme anti-worker group whose funders include billionaires like Charles Koch and the Walton family. It is the latest in a decades-long attack on the rights of working people to join together to improve their jobs and the quality of services they provide.

They are trying to divide us and limit our power, but we won’t stop standing together for our families and our consumers.  The number of elderly Americans is increasing dramatically, and states need to build a stable, qualified workforce to meet the growing need for home care.

Having a strong union for home care workers is the only approach that has proven effective at producing good jobs and quality care.

For our grandparents, for our parents – Stand in solidarity with the home care workers who stand with us.

In the wake of the Supreme Court’s #HarrisvQuinn decision, home care workers are standing strong. Show YOUR solidarity with home care workers.

SHARE this graphic via your Facebook, Twitter, and email accounts:
https://www.facebook.com/SEIU/photos/a.401685982679.184527.19972147679/10152113014617680/?type=1&theater

 

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2014 Leaders in Dignity Conference #LeadershipSkills

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Victory in Grass Valley: Eskaton Workers Join ULTCW!

80 Eskaton workers, located in Grass Valley, voted overwhelmingly to join ULTCW! More long-term care workers uniting for Dignity here in CA!

When the votes were tallied, the totals were as follows: 46 Yes, 16 No (Almost three-to-one!)

This was a campaign where a committee of workers stuck together to win their Union: A major worker lead effort.

This was a particularly special campaign where workers engaged the community and the press very well, and independently.

Congratulations to the committee of workers, ULTCW organizers and researchers who provided support and conducted the analysis of the company that provided workers with the data they needed to succeed!

This is an exciting moment for Nevada County’s long-term caregivers and Nursing Home workers!

seal nevada county

 

 

http://www.theunion.com/news/11904981-113/vote-eskaton-union-workers

June 20, 2014

Eskaton Village workers vote to join union

Workers at Eskaton Village Grass Valley voted “overwhelming” Friday to organize as a union,
the first of Eskaton employee groups in the Northern California-based chain of active senior
living complexes to make that move.

“This is fantastic,” said Eskaton Grass Valley medical technician Kathy Terra of the 42-16 vote
in favor of organizing within the long-term care workers section of the Service Employees
International Union. “We look forward to negotiating with management to make this a better
place.”

Eskaton’s Chief Operating Officer Betsy Donovan could not be reached for comment on Friday.
Eskaton Village med tech Teri DeMunck said the vote will have implications throughout Nevada
County.

“It’s going to change things for assisted living facilities in the county,” DeMunck said. “All
assisted living places will become competitive, and the work atmosphere at all facilities should
improve.”

She said the vote process was empowering.

“We held strong, and our voices were heard,” said DeMunck. “It was an overwhelming victory;
they couldn’t even make a challenge.”

She cautioned that the vote was “only a battle in the war ” because “we still have contract
negotiations to go through.”

SEIU long-term care section organizing coordinator Guadalupe Martinez said the union would go
into effect after the vote is certified by the National Labor Relations Board, a process that could
take about 10 days. She said the vote would have positive effects on the labor climate in Nevada
County.

“This is an opportunity for the workers to raise their standard of living,” Martinez said. “By
doing that, others will want to raise the standards too.”
Workers began casting their mail ballots on June 3. The deadline to vote was Thursday. Results
were announced Friday at the NLRB offices in San Francisco.
Terra, an observer at the vote count, said several Eskaton officials were on hand to observe.

They left after the vote, Terra said.

There was no immediate word on the status of a separate union vote on the guard section of
SEIU. Eskaton’s campus patrol officers were required to seek membership in the guard section,
rather than long-term care.

To contact Staff Writer Keri Brenner, email kbrenner@theunion.com or call 530-477-4239.

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Dignity Alameda Campaign Button

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Job Posting: Research Analyst in Research Dept.

SEIU-ULTCW Research Analyst

Summary:

Research Analyst needed to develop strategies that build a path to power for health care workers in the long-term care delivery system through the strategic analysis of long-term care policies, funding streams and employers. This position is full-time and based in either Oakland or Los Angeles, California and requires long and irregular hours and the ability to travel extensively.

SEIU United Long Term Care Workers requires a candidate that has a passion for social justice and a desire to join workers fighting to change the long-term care industry for the better.

Who is SEIU United Long Term Care Workers?

SEIU United Long Term Care Workers (ULTCW) is California’s leading long term care organization dedicated to providing and protecting quality care for some of our most vulnerable residents. SEIU ULTCW represents 180,000 in-home care providers and nursing home workers throughout California, making it the largest union of long term care givers in California and the second largest SEIU local in the nation. For more information please visit, http://ultcw.org/

About SEIU:

SEIU has 2.1 million members in the US and Canada primarily in health care, property services and public service. SEIU is on the cutting edge of progressive activism, building power by uniting workers to build better communities and strengthen our democracy. Join us if you want to fight for a just society:

  • Where all workers are valued and all people are respected.
  • Where all families and communities thrive.
  • Where we leave a better and more equal world for generations to come.

For more information, please visit, www.seiu.org

Primary Responsibilities:
Develop conceptual frameworks that guide organizing, political and collective bargaining campaigns using a wide variety of research methods and sources, including:

  •  Researching and analyzing individual companies’ financial data, as well as sector, regional and economic factors affecting the long-term care industry
  • Proactively monitor and assess federal, state, and local industry, regulatory and legislative developments and their impact on long-term care deliver systems
  •  Engage long-term care stakeholders in shared priorities
  •  Collaborate with SEIU-ULTCW members on workplace issues
  •  Organize and document analytical results and research procedures
  •  Prepare reports, memos, and articles for publication, speeches, testimony, advertising, surveys, research methodologies, correspondence and other materials for use inside and outside of SEIU.
  • Apply appropriate techniques to collect, analyze and report qualitative and/or quantitative data (including but not limited to Wage & Hour, health and safety discrimination complaints and other charges)
  • Work with lawyers and other vendors on project-related issues Qualifications:
  • Graduation from an accredited four-year college or university
  • Experience working with unions and/or an understanding of their positions on worker issues.
  • A passion for justice, a willingness to learn, the ability to work hard with irregular hours, and the ability to travel frequently
  • Ability to conduct qualitative and quantitative research, and make sound, logical conclusions.
  • Very strong skill in the use of spreadsheets, presentation software and on-line information sources.
  • Ability to work with people from diverse backgrounds and cultures.
  • Ability to communicate effectively, both orally and in writing; ability to make formal presentations.
  • Ability to handle multiple projects and meet established timelines.
  • Ability to learn unfamiliar substantive topic areas quickly

Physical Requirements:
Long and extended hours and travel required. Work is generally performed in an office setting.

Scope and Nature of Supervision:
The qualified candidate will report to the Research Director. Researchers are frequently expected to operate without day-to-day supervision, to develop their own work plans and goals, and to act with a great degree of discretion and independent judgment. Accordingly, they must be strong self-starters and have a commitment to fulfill the objectives of the organization.

Compensation:
SEIU-ULTCW offers competitive salaries and a full range of benefits.

To Apply For This Position:

E-mail a résumé, a letter explaining why you want to do this work and names and contact information of three references to Travis Stein, traviss@seiu-ultcw.org. Please include Research Analyst in the subject line.

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What Does the New State Budget Say About In-Home Supportive Services (IHSS)?

State Budget Q&A – Updated 6/20/14

 

What was the Governor originally proposing in his budget?

The Governor wanted to cap IHSS worker hours to 40 hours per week to avoid paying overtime – a right we won this year when the Obama Administration extended the Fair Labor Standards Act to cover in-home caregivers.  By capping caregiver hours to 40 hours a week, many caregivers would have experienced a significant loss in their hours and their income.  Capping hours would have also interrupted the continuity of care some of our most vulnerable consumers rely on to live safely at home.

The Governor also wanted to keep the 7% cuts to the program in place – across the board cuts made to IHSS hours during the recession.

 

What’s the status on the State Budget?

After months of our members lobbying our legislators and the Governor through personal visits to their offices, phone calls, and emails – and after thousands of ULTCW members attended rallies at the Capitol to ensure our voices were heard, on Sunday, June 15th, the State Assembly and Senate passed budget language that honors overtime to IHSS caregivers starting January 1, 2015, and provides pay for travel time and wait time.  Through our talks with legislators and the Governor, we’ve also created a pathway to continue to work on restoring the 7% cuts to IHSS hours.

 

What are the next steps for this to be final?

With the budget passed by the State Assembly and Senate, the Governor has until June 30th to sign the budget that provides overtime for workers.  During the next few weeks we’ll continue to work with our elected officials to pass legislation that will restore the 7% cuts.  This legislation is separate from the budget.

 

Who gets overtime?

IHSS workers who work over 40 hours a week will receive overtime for up to an additional 26 hours of work per week.

 

How much is overtime?

Overtime pay is time-and-a-half (x1.5 your hourly rate)

 

Is there flexibility with the hours worked in a week?

Yes, there is flexibility in the number of hours you can work in a week.  For example, if your consumer needs extra care one week due to their health, those hours may be worked based on the direction of your consumer.  You will still be held to the total monthly hours your consumer is given. Any hours that may result in working overtime or additional overtime hours will need approval from a social worker. Approval by a social worker may be given retroactively.

 

What if I have more than 283 hours because of the multiple consumers I care for? 

If you work over 283 hours and have more than one recipient, you will contacted by a county social worker within the first three months of the implementation to help manage your hours.

 

What is “travel time”?

If you care for more than one consumer and they live in different locations, you will now be paid for the time it takes you to travel directly from consumer 1 to consumer 2.  You may be paid for up to 1 hour daily – 7 hours max per week.  You can only account for the time it takes you to get from one consumer to the other.  Travel time does not include travel from your home to your client’s home – or from their home to yours.

 

What is “wait time”?

If you accompany your client to a doctor’s appointment and you are required to wait for them, you will now be paid for that time. Wait time hours will be assessed as part of your consumer’s next needs assessment and will be based on the average number of doctors visits your consumer has per month.

 

Why is the State giving 66 hours as a maximum to weekly hours?

The State looked closely at the number of hours caregivers work in California and found that the majority of workers work under 66 hours a month.  This calculation is also based on taking the maximum hours a consumer can receive (283 hours a month) and dividing it by 4.33 weeks (the average weeks per month).  There are situations in which your client may have hours totaling more than 283 due to a personal care waiver.  Those situations will be addressed on a case-by-case basis with a social worker.

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We Won Overtime, But There’s Work To Be Done! #EveryHourCounts

keep calm ULTCWIn September 2013, President Barack Obama directed the Department of Labor to make overtime pay and the protections of the Fair Labor Standards Act available to caregivers.  For the first time, since the FLSA was put in place in 1938, the denial of these basic rights to homecare workers was to end.

However, in January 2014, California Governor Jerry Brown, came up with a way to keep caregivers out in the cold.  He proposed capping In-Home Supportive Services provider hours.  By limiting homecare workers to 160-hour-monthly pay periods, he hoped to circumvent President Obama’s directive.

The Governor’s budget proposal was immediately denounced by SEIU California, ULTCW, SEIU Local 521, UHWW, CUHW, UDW, and dozens of partner organizations who knew that this proposal would not only deny over 60,000 caregivers as much as 43 percent of their income, but would also endanger seniors, and Californians with disabilities, by interrupting their continuity of care.

Caregivers responded with a series of clear messages to the Governor.  IHSS providers traveled to Sacramento to meet with legislators and provide testimony to the committees of the State Senate and Assembly charged with drafting the preliminary 2014-2015 California state budget.  Homecare workers succeeded in generating dozens of television, radio, and print news stories, as well as eliciting multiple editorials by prominent public figures.  ULTCW member, Guillermina Mazariego, even hosted Governor Brown, so he could see why her son Marvin needed over 160 hours of care each month.

But the Governor was undeterred, and when he announced revisions to his proposed 2014-15 budget, in May, he continued to deny overtime to homecare workers.  Caregivers took to the streets, and took over social media, in order protect workers’ rights and preserve continuity of care for IHSS consumers.  Gathering over 20,000 petition signatures, homecare workers launched a petition called, “Every Hour Counts,” that featured a viral YouTube video, a Tumblr page populated by caregivers across the Golden State, and a Thunderclap campaign that reached 71,425 Facebook and Twitter users.

On June 4, hundreds of IHSS providers, consumers, and supporters held a candlelight vigil in front of the Capitol.  On June 5, even more arrived in Sacramento.  At least, 5,000 took part in morning and afternoon actions.  Approximately, 1,000 occupied the Capitol and participated in prayer, chanting, singing, and a sit-in.  These days of escalated field efforts were buttressed by a relentless stream of calls, emails, and Tweets to the Governor and legislators, opposing the proposed cap on overtime hours.

ULTCW members alone generated over 2,000 calls to legislators in fewer than five days, calling on them to not support any budget that failed to support California’s seniors, persons with disabilities, and those who provide care to them.

Because of the power of diverse voices coming to together as one, on June 15, both the State Senate and Assembly passed a trailer bill making overtime pay and FLSA protections available to caregivers.

What’s more, legislative champions of In-Home Supportive Services have agreed to introduce a bill to restore the 7 percent IHSS cut agreed to during the darkest days of California’s financial crisis, so the budget will more fully reflect the moral and ethical concern Californian’s feel for the Golden State’s most vulnerable residents.

***

For Immediate Release
June 16, 2014
  

Contact:  Mike Roth (916) 444-7170

Caregivers Applaud IHSS Overtime Provisions And Vow to Keep Working on Reversing Cuts

Joint statement of Laphonza Butler, President of SEIU California and Doug Moore, Executive Director of United Domestic Workers/AFSCME Local 3930, whose combined affiliates are made up of nearly 400,000 caregivers throughout California.

“IHSS caregivers applaud the IHSS overtime provisions included in the budget passed this weekend by the Legislature and sent to the Governor. The legislature and the Governor worked together to craft a budget that does not include a ban on overtime for IHSS caregivers. This ban would have disrupted care for tens of thousands of recipients, and would have thrown thousands of caregivers’ households, many of which include the care recipient, into deeper poverty. Now, for the first time, caregiversin California will receive the same overtime protections that all other workers enjoy, and that is real progress toward equality and dignity.

“Unfortunately, this budget still retains deep cuts made during our state’s darkesteconomic times to every single recipients’ hours of care regardless of their need. For caregivers, ending these crisis cuts has been an equal priority throughout this year, and we don’t consider our budget work to be finished until these hours of care are restored. We continue to work with the Legislature and the Administration to find a way to do that.”

# # #

CUHW, UDW AFSCME Local 3930 and SEIU (UHW, ULTCW and Local 521) are made up of hundreds of thousands of caregivers across the state who provide in-home support to 450,000 Californians who are sick, elderly or have disabilities.

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Breaking News: State Budget Includes Overtime

capalert ULTCWFor Immediate Release
June 16, 2014
  

Contact:  Mike Roth (916) 444-7170

Caregivers Applaud IHSS Overtime Provisions And Vow to Keep Working on Reversing Cuts

Joint statement of Laphonza Butler, President of SEIU California and Doug Moore, Executive Director of United Domestic Workers/AFSCME Local 3930, whose combined affiliates are made up of nearly 400,000 caregivers throughout California.

“IHSS caregivers applaud the IHSS overtime provisions included in the budget passed this weekend by the Legislature and sent to the Governor. The legislature and the Governor worked together to craft a budget that does not include a ban on overtime for IHSS caregivers. This ban would have disrupted care for tens of thousands of recipients, and would have thrown thousands of caregivers’ households, many of which include the care recipient, into deeper poverty. Now, for the first time, caregivers in California will receive the same overtime protections that all other workers enjoy, and that is real progress toward equality and dignity.

“Unfortunately, this budget still retains deep cuts made during our state’s darkest economic times to every single recipients’ hours of care regardless of their need. For caregivers, ending these crisis cuts has been an equal priority throughout this year, and we don’t consider our budget work to be finished until these hours of care are restored. We continue to work with the Legislature and the Administration to find a way to do that.”

# # #

CUHW, UDW AFSCME Local 3930 and SEIU (UHW, ULTCW and Local 521) are made up of hundreds of thousands of caregivers across the state who provide in-home support to 450,000 Californians who are sick, elderly or have disabilities.

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MEDIA ADVISORY: Day of Action in Sacramento, June 5, 5:30 AM – 3 PM

For Immediate Release
June 5, 2014
  

Contact:  Mike Roth (916) 444-7170

 

Over 5,000 Converge on Capitol to Urge
Governor Brown to Reverse Crisis-Era Cuts & Drop Hours Cap Proposal

Caregivers, Seniors and People with Disabilities Occupy Capitol Building in Massive Day of Action

SACRAMENTO, CA –  In a day of action that coincided with the final days of budget talks in the Capitol, more than 5,000 home care providers and the seniors and people with disabilities for whom they provide care rallied outside the Capitol and more than 1,000 occupied the rotunda, demanding that Governor Brown rescind his proposed budget cuts to In-Home Supportive Services (IHSS).

“We’ve come together in unprecedented numbers because the health and well-being of California’s seniors and people with disabilities demands urgent action,” said one caregiver.   “Continuing cuts made during the darkest hours of the state budget crisis is not only uncaring, it is unwarranted amidst a multi-billion dollar budget surplus.”

Joined by legislators committed to protecting and strengthening IHSS, caregivers, seniors and people with disabilities participated in activities that demonstrated the growing energy behind the movement to protect home care.  More than 4,000 participated in a massive rally that included stories of IHSS clients and their caregivers. A “24 Hours of Care” memorial was erected as a powerful illustration of how each hour of care delivered through IHSS is so much more than just an hour of time but a critical link in the health and happiness of those served by the program. A photo booth enabled caregivers and those for whom they care to customize photo messages to be delivered to Governor Brown and shared through social media.

Following the rally, more than 1,000 care providers, seniors and people with disabilities marched inside the Capitol to occupy the first and second floors. With chants, songs, and prayers, the participants implored Governor Brown to drop his proposed IHSS cuts.  On the walls outside the Governor’s office, they posted stories of how his proposals would destabilize seniors and people with disabilities and undermine care.

The action comes as legislators and the Governor are negotiating a final budget for the 2014-15 Fiscal Year. As caregivers urged the Governor to drop his IHSS budget proposals, they also called on legislators to stand strong in the decision they have already made to reject these proposals.

The Governor’s proposal maintains a reduction, made in the darkest hours of the state budget crisis, that means elderly Californians and people with disabilities receive 7% fewer hours of care than the state has determined they need to stay healthy at home.  It also prohibits caregivers who work long hours for low pay from working overtime, circumventing an Obama Administration decision that would finally afford in-home caregivers the same basic overtime protections as all other workers.    Approximately 58,000 IHSS caregivers rely on overtime hours to make ends meet.  The Governor’s proposal means that they will all lose up to 43% of their incomes –income that is often used to feed, purchase medicine, clothe and house IHSS consumers that they live with.

Since January, when the Governor first released his proposals to cap caregiver hours and maintain deep cuts to clients’ hours of care made during the darkest hours of the California’s fiscal crisis, caregivers and clients have united to fight the destructive proposals.

“It is a moral outrage that the sick, elderly, and people with disabilities continue to be targeted for budget cuts that undermine their independence and dignity and ultimately cost taxpayers more money,” said Gary Passmore of the Congress of California Seniors.

 

# # #

CUHW, UDW AFSCME Local 3930 and SEIU (UHW, ULTCW and Local 521) are made up of hundreds of thousands of caregivers across the state who provide in-home support to 450,000 Californians who are sick, elderly or have disabilities.

 

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MEDIA ADVISORY: Candlelight Vigil Outside Capitol, June 4, 7:30 PM

http://everyhrcounts.org/

MEDIA ALERT for Wednesday, June 4, 2014  

Contact:  Mike Roth (916) 444-7170

 

With Budget Talks Entering Final Days,
Thousands Gear Up to Fight Cuts to Home Care  

Candlelight Vigil will Light Up Capitol Wednesday Evening
With Symbols of Care, Compassion

SACRAMENTO, CA – Faith leaders will join more than 500 home care providers and the seniors and people with disabilities for whom they provide care at a candlelight vigil Wednesday evening, praying and reflecting as they prepare for a rally of more than 4,000 caregivers who will demand that Governor Brown protect and strengthen home care.

In the coming days, legislators and the Governor will be negotiating a final budget. Caregivers will ask the Governor to drop his IHSS budget proposals and ask legislators to stand strong in the decision they have already made to reject these proposals.

Prayers and first-hand testimony from caregivers and IHSS clients will highlight the unique bonds that Gov. Brown proposes to disrupt by capping caregiver hours, and will illustrate the impacts of crisis-era cuts to IHSS on the health and dignity clients.  Caregivers will release 24 heart -shaped balloons, symbolizing how every hour of care is so much more than just an hour of time, but is vital to the well-being of those the IHSS program serves.

       Who:             Caregivers, people with disabilities, seniors, faith leaders and community allies

 

When:             Wednesday, June 4, 2014
7:30pm

Where:            State Capitol, South Side
Sacramento, CA 95814

Visuals:          

  • Hundreds of caregivers, seniors, and people with disabilities light candles.
  • Heart shaped balloons released to symbolize care and compassion that underpin home care
  • Images of care, and compassion projected on giant LED screens.

 

# # #

http://everyhrcounts.org/

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