November 2011

IMMEDIATE ACTION REQUIRED

YOUR CLIENT WILL ONLY HAVE 15 DAYS TO SEND BACK THEIR APPLICATION FOR SUPPLEMENTAL CARE

1) Talk to Your Client about the cuts:
Tell your client to let you know when they receive their Notice of Action in early December informing them of the 20% cut to IHSS hours. Along with the Notice of Action, there will be an Application for Supplemental Care. Filling out the application and mailing it back could help protect some or all of your client’s IHSS hours.

2) Help Your Client fill out the application:
Help your client fill out the application by using the worksheet to the right. It’s important that your client is able to explain in the application how cuts to their care hours would jeopardize their ability to remain safely at home. If your client needs you to complete the application of their behalf, you must fill out the box on the form asking for your name and relationship to your client to ensure that it is fairly processed.

3) Remind Your Client to mail the application right away!:
Remind your client that they have until January 3, 2012, or 15 days after receipt of the Notice of Action to send their application in. By completing the application, your client’s IHSS hours will be automatically restored until the county takes action on his or her application. This means that filling out the application and mailing it back protects their IHSS hours for at least a month.

Check in with your client every day until they have received their Notice of Action and mailed in their application. If your client doesn’t receive their Notice of Action by December 17, 2011, OR call the Member Action Center for more information.

Call the Member Action Center at 1-877 MY ULTCW (1-877-698-5829) to find out about appeals process trainings happening in your area!

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SEIU: Occupy Los Angeles Has Sparked a Movement Toward Income Equality

The following is a statement from Laphonza Butler, president of SEIU – United Long Term Care Workers; Dave Regan, president of SEIU – United Healthcare Workers West; and Bill Lloyd, executive director of SEIU Local 99 Education Workers United about the eviction of Occupy Los Angeles.

The occupation at Los Angeles City Hall marked the beginning of a powerful movement toward income equality in our country. And it was an important alignment with the spirit behind Occupy Wall Street actions around the country for which we share with common cause. The visible protest sparked conversation and an imminent wave of change to restore power to American families and remove it from the hands of enormous corporations.

While the occupation phase ended peacefully last night, the stark divide between the super wealthy and the vast majority of Americans has been exposed and we now have the language and the space to discuss the economy honestly.

SEIU members have been a constant presence at Occupy LA both participating in the conversation and delivering healthcare to the uninsured. Every day we see the affects of declining wages, increasing health insurance costs and limited access to quality education and affordable healthcare. Together we are putting attention on the needs of the 99 percent of families in America who are struggling to make ends meet and that conversation has just begun.

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AS IN-HOME CAREGIVERS THROUGHOUT CALIFORNIA ARE HONORED FOR THEIR WORK, VITAL SUPPORT PROGRAMS FACE DETRIMENTAL CUTS

November is designated “Family Caregivers Month” as In-Home Supportive Services (IHSS) Is Threatened by 20% Cut Due to State Budget Woes

LOS ANGELES, Nov. 28, 2011 — During the month of November city and county officials throughout California have been honoring the essential role over six million Californians play as caregivers to family members and friends by designating the month of November as “Family Caregivers Month.” However, the proclamations come as vital caregiver support programs such as In-Home Supportive Services (IHSS) are slated to be cut.

Coordinated by SEIU United Long Term Care Workers (ULTCW), which represents over 180,000 California in-home caregivers and nursing home workers, proclamations raising awareness of the important work of in-home caregivers and their “courage to care” have been passed by nearly 30 city councils and county board of supervisors with more scheduled for this week (see full list below).

“In-home caregivers play an essential role in ensuring that seniors and people with disabilities have the vital care required to keep them out of nursing homes and living safely at home, while saving taxpayers millions of dollars each year,” said Ventura County Supervisor Linda Parks. “On behalf of the Ventura County Board of Supervisors, we are proud to designate the month of November as Family Caregivers Month – a time to recognize the contributions of all in-home caregivers.”

However, as elected officials throughout the state are recognizing the work of in-home caregivers and the vital role they play in protecting some of our most vulnerable residents, the In-Home Supportive Services program, which provides essential in-home care to over 400,000 California seniors and disabled residents, is facing a 20% cut to care hours as part of the 2011/12 state budget $700 million “trigger cuts” that were signed into law.

“If implemented, these trigger cuts to the IHSS program would place hundreds of thousands of fragile lives in jeopardy,” said Laphonza Butler, president of SEIU ULTCW. “Every hour of in-home care taken from our parents, grand parents, and children with disabilities places them in danger of experiencing falls, breaking bones, not taking their medications, or even worse. We simply can’t balance our states budget on the backs of our seniors and those with disabilities. The consequences are too great.”

Although the state deadline for determining whether or not trigger cuts will be enacted is December 15th, state officials have indicated that the state revenue projections are not expected to meet the requirements to stave off the cuts that would take effect on January 1, 2012.

If trigger cuts are enacted, IHSS recipients will receive a letter in the mail informing them of the 20% cut to their hours and explaining the Supplemental Care Application they must fill out and return within a small window of time in order to potentially protect as many care hours as possible.

SEIU ULTCW, Disability Rights California and other organizations are working to raise awareness throughout the senior and disability communities, as well as with caregivers, to ensure that care recipients are aware of the application process and how to exercise their rights.

Cities and Counties That Have Recognized the Work of In-Home Caregivers by Declaring November as “Family Caregivers Month” include:

County of Los AngelesCity of Los AngelesAlameda CountyCity of OaklandNapa CountyCity of RialtoCity of Monterey ParkCity of Bell GardensCity of San BernardinoCity of OxnardVentura County City of Santa Paula City of GlendaleCity of Baldwin ParkCity of PomonaCity of CarsonCity of DowneyCity of LynwoodSan Bernardino CountyMonterey CountySan Benito CountySanta Cruz CountyCity of WatsonvilleCity of InglewoodCity of GardenaCity of OntarioCity of ComptonCity of CudahyCity of FontanaCity of VictorvilleCity of RosemeadCity of South Gate

SEIU United Long Term Care Workers (ULTCW) is California’s leading long term care organization representing 180,000 workers dedicated to providing and protecting quality care for some of our most vulnerable residents.

Media Contacts: Wendy Carrillo (213) 321-7085 WendyC@seiu-ultcw.org Scott Mann (323) 333-4850 Scott@BDRK.com

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Sacramento Bee: As In-Home Caregivers Throughout California Are Honored for Their Work, Vital Support Programs Face Detrimental Cuts


During the month of November city and county officials throughout California have been honoring the essential role over six million Californians play as caregivers to family members and friends by designating the month of November as “Family Caregivers Month.” However, the proclamations come as vital caregiver support programs such as In-Home Supportive Services (IHSS) are slated to be cut.

Coordinated by SEIU United Long Term Care Workers (ULTCW), which represents over 180,000 California in-home caregivers and nursing home workers, proclamations raising awareness of the important work of in-home caregivers and their “courage to care” have been passed by nearly 30 city councils and county board of supervisors with more scheduled for this week (see full list below).

“In-home caregivers play an essential role in ensuring that seniors and people with disabilities have the vital care required to keep them out of nursing homes and living safely at home, while saving taxpayers millions of dollars each year,” said Ventura County Supervisor Linda Parks. “On behalf of the Ventura County Board of Supervisors, we are proud to designate the month of November as Family Caregivers Month – a time to recognize the contributions of all in-home caregivers.”

Read more: http://www.sacbee.com/2011/11/28/4085037/as-in-home-caregivers-throughout.html#ixzz1f8Dohupx

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Community Coalition: Banks Should Give Back, Help Create Jobs in South L.A.

Part of “The Fight for a Fair Economy” series
By Laphonza Butler

You don’t have to go far to see the struggles of the South Los Angeles community. You can drive up and down any street and see closed businesses, foreclosed homes and working families facing tremendous obstacles as they try to make ends meet. There is no doubt that the hardships of South L.A. families have deepened during the economic crisis.

In Los Angeles County, African Americans are facing a 19% unemployment rate while Latinos are facing 14%.

Of course, preceding the job crisis was the near meltdown of our financial banking system. Many people are familiar with the pattern of corporate greed that reached a head at the national level in 2008, when Wall Street banks accepted a $700 billion taxpayer bailout but failed to pass on the assistance to struggling homeowners and small businesses. Yet fewer people are aware that this same dynamic occurs in South L.A.

JPMorgan Chase, Bank of America and Citibank are three dominant banking institutions in South L.A. Combined, they control over 70% of the market share in South L.A. Last year alone, local residents made a total of over $3 billion in deposits, according to federal data.

Yet from 2006 to 2009, these same banks cut lending to South L.A. small businesses by 70%. If small business owners can’t get loans from banks, then they can’t open or expand their business and hire more workers. These banks are also leading the way in foreclosures and own a vast portion of vacant homes in this community.

The investment the South L.A. community makes in these big banks is clearly not being reciprocated in small business lending or in job creation. It is yet another example of the misguided actions of big-bank CEOs who only care about their bottom lines and not the communities they serve.

As president of the SEIU United Long Term Care Workers (ULTCW), I have witnessed the devastating impact that this financial crisis has had on everyday people. Our union is made up of over 180,000 home care providers who live and work in South L.A. and other similar communities throughout the state, taking care of our sick, elderly and most vulnerable citizens. Our members have been deeply affected by the economic recession, which has also led to severe state budget cuts in services and jobs in our communities.

We are a part of the 99%. Last month, we joined hundreds of other union members, community groups, unemployed families and students at an Occupy L.A. march, protesting the corporate greed and lack of accountability that has led to record unemployment and an unprecedented wealth gap in our country.

Standing up to big banks that take advantage of our communities is only one part of the equation. We must also fight for good jobs and understand it is linked to the fight for corporate accountability. We must demand that banks and corporations invest in our communities by providing consumer services and lending to small businesses and pay their fair share of taxes to help rebuild our infrastructure, schools and health care system – both will help provide good jobs.

At ULTCW, we value the input of the community. We are willing to fight, be heard and win the resources our families need. Together, we can fight for a just society, good jobs for South L.A. and win against the corporate greed of big banks.

Laphonza Butler is President of SEIU United Long Term Care Workers (ULTCW), the second largest SEIU local in the nation.

Originally posted at: http://www.cocomovement.org/?p=166

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Statement from SEIU United Long Term Care Workers in Support of Occupy Los Angeles New Occupation at Bank of America Plaza

Members of SEIU United Long Term Care Workers (ULTCW) are in full support of the occupation of the Bank of America Plaza by the Occupy Los Angeles movement.

Los Angeles, CA — It is time that banks; CEO’s and the 1% of wealthiest of Americans pay their fair share.
As the Super Committee debates, points fingers and ultimately sets the stage to cut $500 billion in Medicare funding that severely jeopardizes the lives of workers and those in need, big banks continue growing their profits without giving back.

“In 2008, when Wall Street banks accepted a $700 billion taxpayer bailout, they failed to commit to struggling homeowners and small businesses,” said Laphonza Butler, President of SEIU ULTCW.

“Last year along, the South Los Angeles community made deposits to the tune of over $3 billion. Yet, from 2006 through 2009, big banks cut lending to South LA small businesses by 70%, and led the way in foreclosures while growing their ownership of a vast portion of vacant homes.”
Working families throughout our fair city deserve better.

Yesterday’s large demonstrations across the city, state and nation are a testament of the will of the American people to fight for our basic constitutional rights – life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness – without the interference of corporate greed.

We call on our elected leadership on the local, state and federal level to support Occupy LA and to have the courage to care, stand up to corporate interest and be champions for the 99%.

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Media Contact: Wendy Carrillo | 213.321.7085 cell | wendyc@seiu-ultcw.org

SEIU United Long Term Care Workers (ULTCW) is California’s leading long term care organization dedicated to providing and protecting quality care for some of our most vulnerable residents. SEIU ULTCW represents 180,000 in-home care providers and nursing home workers throughout California, making it the largest union of long term caregivers in California and the second largest SEIU local in the nation.

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Rene Gonzales Ramos’ Story

Rene with Family members in Guatemala

Hi my name is Rene Gonzales Ramos and I live in Los Angeles, CA. I have been a family caregiver for 4.5 years and I care for my Mother who is 93 years old. In 1993, I was working as a teacher’s assistant at the San Mateo Adult School Program for the ESL class. It was at that center that I was invited to take the caregiver class. At that time I decided to attend to learn more. After 12 weeks of class, I graduated—being the only male from a class that started with 35 students. After graduating, I planned on becoming a homecare teacher in Guatemala, where I grew up. I did not know that receiving such training was preparing me to become a caregiver to my parents who needed my presence in their Los Angeles home some time later. I am very thankful for this training, and it was such a blessing that it ended up preparing me to become the caregiver my parents needed.

Rene's Mother and his Father's Gravesite

In 2006, I was still in Southern California but all of my belongings were packed for Guatemala. I had taken a short term job for a friend’s construction company but was still planning to move when it was over. Over that short period of time, I started noticing that my Parents’ caregivers were not giving them the attention I knew they deserved. At the time my Father was extremely ill and I knew we were coming up on his last days so I decided to take on the care for both of my parents.

In early 2006, my Father passed away, I now only take care of my Mother. However, at 93 years old, it is truly a full time position. I now cannot imagine doing anything else in my life that is more important than taking care of her in these vulnerable years.

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Edik Valijan’s Story

My name is Edik Valijan and I have been a homecare provider since 1999, when I began to take care of my parents Sheram and Zaghik Valijan in Glendale, CA. When they first needed care they had a provider taking care of them that they applied for through the IHSS program. However, my Mother was not happy with the provider that was assigned to her and my Father. It was at that time that I decided to take over the care for both of my parents. I also have siblings, but they could not leave their jobs and so it was left up to me to make that decision. That’s how I became a homecare provider; I knew that I could take care of them better than anyone else.

For example, a few days ago my father was not feeling well and I went to my parent’s place and spent the whole night taking care of him. If they had a non-family provider I don’t think the provider would spend so many hours in the consumer’s house after working their shift.

I cannot imagine not being the primary care provider to my parents. If I put them with someone else or in a nursing home, my parents will live with less care and it will affect their well-being and possibly the length of their life.

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Rong Gen Wang’s Story

My name is Rong Gen Wang and I have been a homecare worker for 3 years and a US Resident for just over 3 years. I live in San Gabriel where I take care of both of my parents. My parents were here in the US living with my Brother before I came out here. Before my brother passed away, he sent for me in Shanghai so that I could be with my parents. My Father is 89 and my Mother is 85 years old and they need me very much.

I believe that being a caregiver for my parents is easier than another client because I know my parents very well and I know what they like and don’t like. They also understand my temperament and my needs, as well. I feel that in our culture it is important to understand that the children have the duty to take care of their parents, as they get older.

Even though I was better, economically, in Shanghai, I know that I belong here with them. I would not put my parents in a nursing home or hospital because they would be lonely and I do not think they would get the same quality of care that I can provide them. Since they live with me and I am their caregiver, we are able to maintain a family relationship, which is very important to us. In China families always live together, many generations will be in one home, and the children care for the elderly.

Being a home care worker, however, is very challenging. So far it is the only job that I have had in the United States and I don’t feel that it is a “good” job. The health benefits I do have are very hard to manage. All doctor appointments in San Gabriel need to be made on Mondays. I sometimes wait on the phone for over an hour before they tell me there are no more appointments for that week and I have to call back next Monday. This system is very frustrating and I hope that one day I will have a job with better benefits.

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Maria Andrade’s Story

Hi my name is Maria Andrade and I have been a home care worker for 7 years. I take care of my son, Rudy, 24 hours per day and I live in Ventura, Ca.

My son had a stroke when he was born and needs 24-hour care and can never be alone. While I have taken care of him since birth, I did not become an IHSS recipient until 7 years ago when my son turned 18 and was then qualified to receive Social Security.

He depends on me to feed him, bathe him and cloth him. He cannot even go to the bathroom alone. Without me as his caregiver, he would not receive the same quality of care that I provide. The first few years were very hard on us because he didn’t qualify for state or federal assistance, at this time I would work in the farms to make money during the day and have additional family members take turns watching him. I was constantly asking for support from my family members and this was very hard on the whole family. After receiving IHSS, 7 years ago, I still was not receiving full time hours and continued to work during the day.

Three years ago, I finally got full time hours and can now be with my Son all day and I do not have to work or ask family members to help out. I am so relieved to have full time hours because the job of taking care of him is really 24 hours per day.

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